The Polyamorous Misanthrope

Wielding the Stick of Grandmotherly Kindness

12,638 notes &

cumaeansibyl:

pyrrhiccomedy:

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.
So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.
So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.
When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

thank you, this is ridiculous
like, just for instance, physically going into a bookstore has little or nothing to do, these days, with whether or not you read books
also maybe a lot of books go unfinished because of Sturgeon’s Law? you know, 90% of everything is crap? maybe people don’t finish the books they buy because they found out the books suck. (most of the time when I don’t finish a book it’s because another book appealed to me more.)
and for real, 80% of families not buying or reading any books doesn’t ring true for me at all. at the absolute minimum there are a lot of families with kids who are reading books for bedtime stories, for school, whatever. more like “80% of families didn’t buy or read books from us”

All I know is that this infographic makes me feel like Reader Georg.

cumaeansibyl:

pyrrhiccomedy:

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.

So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.

So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.

When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

thank you, this is ridiculous

like, just for instance, physically going into a bookstore has little or nothing to do, these days, with whether or not you read books

also maybe a lot of books go unfinished because of Sturgeon’s Law? you know, 90% of everything is crap? maybe people don’t finish the books they buy because they found out the books suck. (most of the time when I don’t finish a book it’s because another book appealed to me more.)

and for real, 80% of families not buying or reading any books doesn’t ring true for me at all. at the absolute minimum there are a lot of families with kids who are reading books for bedtime stories, for school, whatever. more like “80% of families didn’t buy or read books from us

All I know is that this infographic makes me feel like Reader Georg.

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

46,637 notes &

sassydragon:

sassydragon:

but imagine if we had tiny little dragons

the size of puppies

and they would go wherever we went sitting on our shoulders and hissing at everyone who tried to touch you because you’re their most special thing in the universe and they are so tiny it’s ridiculously cute

the fact that this post has more notes than i ever expected makes me really glad 

Lady Sybil might have a few things to say about shoulder dragons.

(via yearoftheflood)

66,097 notes &

sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

I honestly thought it was the fashion among youngsters to wear clothes that shows the bra as an accessory. Not to my personal taste, mind, but I’m an old lady.

sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

I honestly thought it was the fashion among youngsters to wear clothes that shows the bra as an accessory. Not to my personal taste, mind, but I’m an old lady.

(via theladyems)

12 notes &

Book recommendations

Okay, my son, who does like to read, but doesn’t entirely share my tastes, needs some new books.

He loves Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, the Harry Potter series, Bone, Shakespeare plays, Mathew Loony, Calvin and Hobbes…

I keep striking out when I hand him books I’ve loved.  While I love LotR and Harry Potter, when I handed him Dune, he found it a dud.  Anyone have any ideas for some books to hand him?  

9 notes &

A Good Libertarian

I know a Libertarian. I know the stereotype and goodness knows it is often deserved.

But this is what happened.

He was buying groceries. The woman in front of him was counting out pennies to buy what she needed. She had enough for the baby food and the diapers, but not enough for the sodas and a disposable foil pan.  She paid and rushed out.

Now, God knows sodas and tin foil pans aren’t big ole necessities, nor  are they going to earn you frugal points.  

He quietly paid for the items she had to leave on the counter and asked the bagger to run give them to her (he prefers to do this sort of thing really quietly). It was twenty bucks, which was little enough to him. He’s not rich, but he can afford that sometimes.

We were talking about it, and he commented, “I know that sodas aren’t a necessity or anything, but she looked like that might have been all the luxury she was going to get this week, and she needed a morale boost.”

This particular person, by the way, would argue we live in an oligarchy rather than a capitalism, and the oligarchy is making things unnecessarily tough on people who work hard and struggle.  When laws support the rich getting richer, it’s not a free market.

232 notes &

kimchicuddles:

What kinds of assumptions do people make about you? What kinds of assumptions do you make about other people?

Oh my fucking God.
I don’t actually hate threesomes, but holy mother of God and all her insane children, I fucking well hate the whole “bi in context of a man” shit you see all over the fucking place.

AUUUGGHHHH GRRR AAUGHGHHHGH!!!! *GROWL* *SNARL*

kimchicuddles:

What kinds of assumptions do people make about you? What kinds of assumptions do you make about other people?

Oh my fucking God.

I don’t actually hate threesomes, but holy mother of God and all her insane children, I fucking well hate the whole “bi in context of a man” shit you see all over the fucking place.

AUUUGGHHHH GRRR AAUGHGHHHGH!!!! *GROWL* *SNARL*

(via thewhisperinglady)

19,564 notes &

jtotheizzoe:

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

Can you imagine showing this to a farmer who was alive and planting just 50 years ago? They’d think we were space aliens.

I’m 45.  One of the things I often say is, “I love living in the future.”

My son is going to be moving about 500 miles away in a couple of days.  I got him to set up a Skype account on his tablet so we could talk face to face sometimes.  Many of you will be eyerolling this as a completely blase thing.  And you know what?  It is to you and that’s awesome.  I’m glad that using a computer to talk face to face is utterly commonplace.

When I was a little girl and went to Disneyworld, however, the idea of any sort of video chat was still considered science fiction.  Space Mountain had this display where a family was video chatting a birthday with a branch of their family on Mars. (Obviously they did minimize the speed of light lag, but still…)

I routinely do a lot of things now that were science fiction when I was a child.  To my son, it’s like a toaster. To me, it is a source of wonder and awesome.  It’s why I can’t sneer at a selfie, or brand online friendships as being not real.  I read fantastic futuristic stories about that stuff as a child.

And it fucking rocks.

175,865 notes &

wendycorduroy:

ohyeeeahman:

adventureiwillalwaysseek:

orange is the new black solving world problems

I had this exact conversation with my friend and her mom when I was like 14. They still don’t believe me.

YOU DONT UNDERSTAND, THEY SPEND THE WHOLE EPISODE TALKING ABOUT THIS BEFORE SOPHIA GIVES THEM A MIRROR AND SEX ED LESSONS

I’da figured plenty of people sorted this one out through masturbation, though I get a young teenager needing it sorted out.

(via autopilotfootprints)

3 notes &

A Discovery About Reading

I used to think of myself as a genre-style reader.  I first discovered science fiction in fourth grade. My fourth grade reader had “The Fun They Had” by Isaac Asimov and “All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury. I started getting books by those authors from the library and noticed there were a lot of books with pictures of rocket ships and images of atoms on them.

(I thought this was code for “Books girls like” cause I’m a girl and I liked them.  I was in my teens before I discovered how male-dominated SF tended to be)

But in general, I tended to read books by AUTHORS I liked rather than by genre.

I never realized how author oriented I was until a friend of mine pointed me at Feed by Mira Grant (Seanan McGuire).  Loved, loved, loved the Newflesh stories, even though I am totally and utterly NOT a fan of horror or zombie movies. (Though The Walking Dead is amazingly well-written).

Another genre that tends to be really bland and boring to me?

Urban Fantasy.  Mostly I don’t like it.

But I’m on the second book in the October Daye series and yeah, I’m hooked.  So yeah, I guess I’ll just put McGuire on my list of “I’ll read anything she writes.”

So, apparently, it’s not the genre that I like or not, but the actual writer.

I am wondering why in the world I am having such a hard time finding any writer I like in mainstream literature then?

5 notes &

Participating in Cheating

I am a woman who is a solo polyamorist.  I experienced a painful break-up with a FWB over a year ago, and I took it very hard (I have never taken this long to get over a break-up before), so I’ve been a poly without any relationships for a long time.  Over the past six months or so, I’ve become tired of my loneliness and feeling ready to get back in the love game – but I am not interested in a…

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448,614 notes &

whosfuckingbad:

maltese-vulcan:

french-verbz:

Well now I can correctly moonwalk away from uncomfortable situations

Because everyone deserves to know how to do a mean moonwalk.

guYS THIS IS IMPORTANT

What freaks me out is the instructional gif about something that was popular before casual internet use was a thing. Hell, only the rich nerds owned computers in the early 80s.

(Source: alexbam2006, via smoresi)